2016 ANNUAL REPORT




LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


AT THE GLOBAL LEVEL, OUR DISCOURSE IS INFUSED WITH CAUTIOUS OPTIMISM AND DETERMINATION.














BUT IN FAR TOO MANY PLACES, THE END OF AIDS IS STILL AN ILLUSION
Think back 15 years ago, just after the turn of the millennium. Picture yourself walking down the street, turning to a stranger and asking them to name the biggest health problem in the world. The likely answer: AIDS.

If you tried that same experiment today, AIDS probably wouldn’t make their list. That’s a good thing. We’ve made dramatic progress in the fight against HIV. But AIDS still continues to claim many more lives than most people realize.

In 2014 alone, 1.2 million people died of AIDS. Worryingly, HIV-related deaths among adolescents have tripled since 2000 – an alarming increase, and, while new HIV infections are falling globally, they are on the rise in many countries – mostly in the developing world and among key populations, such as men who have sex with men, transgender people, sex workers, and people who inject drugs.

Today, many people aren’t benefiting from increased access to comprehensive HIV prevention, care and treatment services: young women and girls are not adequately supported to make their own health decisions; many men who have sex with men are unable to be honest with health care providers for fear of being harassed, arrested or jailed; migrants are excluded from many national health systems; men and boys are not accessing HIV treatment as readily as they should because health services are not adequately promoted as avenues for managing men’s health; sex workers and their clients are discouraged from seeking health care by punitive laws; transgender people find both prejudicial and uninformed health care workers a barrier to accessing services; and people who use drugs frequently risk detention if they seek out care.

In this way, the “global HIV epidemic” is a misnomer. There is not just one epidemic. Some people in some places are witnessing historic success – they can access and afford a variety of lifesaving HIV prevention and treatment options and live knowing their rights and freedoms are protected. In many other places, where political commitment to HIV is weak, health systems are deficient and human rights are persistently violated, the picture is bleak.

There has been a great deal of discussion in policy circles about already having the tools we need to end AIDS. We’ve set a deadline, created targets and updated global treatment, care and prevention guidelines to help us reach our goal. At the global level, our discourse is infused with cautious optimism and determination.

But in far too many places, the end of AIDS is still an illusion.

Not only are there fewer signs of progress, there is growing scepticism around whether the world will follow through on commitments to bring the epidemic to an end.

The reality is that our global pronouncements are often slow to be taken up in the real world. And in the fight against AIDS, delay is tantamount to defeat. If we are to truly end AIDS, we must ensure that sound science grounded in human rights approaches is more rapidly and thoroughly put to use to achieve concrete results for people – especially those who are marginalized and socially excluded. AIDS will not end until those at the very forefront of the epidemic – those whose voices are all too frequently insufficiently heard in the hallways of political power and influence – have access to the latest scientific and biomedical advancements that we know are so critical. And access to these will not be attained until human rights considerations, and their inextricable links to HIV, are squarely addressed. Unless this is done, AIDS will not be over. We must be sure our efforts succeed in all places and for all people. Only then can we declare victory.

Recognizing the profound challenges ahead, has led us to re-examine the role, purpose and position of the International AIDS Society (IAS) in the global response to AIDS. Over the past year, we consulted with hundreds of our members and partners to better understand what they need from us. The result is a new direction for the IAS, embodied by our organizational strategy for 2016-2020. It rests on three pillars:

Recognizing the profound challenges ahead has led us to re-examine the role, purpose and position of the International AIDS Society (IAS) in the global response to AIDS. Over the past year, we consulted with hundreds of our members and partners to better understand what they need from us. The result is a new direction for the IAS, embodied by our organizational strategy for 2016-2020. It rests on three pillars:

  • Science: Pushing for the full spectrum of scientific achievement – from basic science to implementation research – and using IAS’ convening power to highlight dynamic, innovative work.

  • People: Ensuring that those responsible for putting science into practice – researchers, physicians, nurses, laboratory workers, community workers and civil society – have the resources they need to do their jobs.

  • Progress: Driving rapid and sustained improvement in health outcomes by using IAS’ scientific authority to move science into policy and policy into tangible impact against the epidemic.

As a membership-driven organization, we have a responsibility to move beyond rhetoric and spotlight evidence-informed, human rights-centred solutions to the epidemic everywhere in the world. It is our responsibility to represent our members – including frontline HIV workers – to the normative, regulatory and policymaking bodies that impact their work. To be a collective voice for change and a place where science and community meet. That voice is urgently needed during the next several months leading to the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016).

IAS will use its convening power to push change on a national and regional level as the steward of AIDS 2016. Just as the 2000 International AIDS Conference in Durban served as a catalyst for global treatment advocacy and access, the return of the conference to Durban this year will be a defining moment to establish a clear path toward guaranteeing that no one is left behind in the AIDS response.

Sincerely,


Owen Ryan
IAS Executive Director



This letter is an excerpt from the inaugural IAS Annual Letter 2016. Read the full document here.

The content of this document reflects overlapping calendar years from January 2015 to June 2016, however the financial statements will continue to span the standard annual calendar year of January 2015 – December 2015.


IAS COMMITMENTS



In an environment of increasingly constrained resources, it is more important than ever to prioritize the actions that will have the greatest impact. The IAS’ strategic approach is to ensure that every action is grounded in science, respects the rights of key and priority populations and is adequately funded for success.

The IAS has a unique ability to reach and support key stakeholders through our membership network and the advocacy platform we are building. Our convening power remains as strong as ever and is a catalytic force that is increasingly harnessed. Under the strategic vision of Science. People. Progress. we will match that strength with a representative voice for progressive change in the response to AIDS. Now more than ever.

The IAS has moved forward with these five immediate actions:


TRANSLATE EVIDENCE TO A REGIONAL CONTEXT

Convene tailored scientific symposia across four regions: Latin America, West Africa, Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia. The meetings will be accessible to IAS members and national policymakers in orderto lead practical discussions of the gaps between policy, implementation and what frontline workers need to realize their full potential. These efforts will support scientific advancements that positively alter the course of the HIV epidemic and promote greater understanding of new discoveries.


PROVIDE DIRECT ACCESS FOR FRONTLINE HEALTH WORKERS TO GLOBAL- AND NATIONAL-LEVEL MEETINGS

The newly created IAS Educational Fund will provide support to health clinicians and advocates that allows them to attend IAS-convened meetings and then bring that learning home in tangible ways to their community and workplace. This will include access to peer-learning tools, translational presentations and the latest scientific data to support the professionalization of the HIV workforce – particularly the next generation.


IMPROVE TREATMENT ACCESS AND THE MEANINGFUL ENGAGEMENT OF ADOLESCENTS

Identify and address gaps in adolescent HIV prevention and care programmes through increased crosssector partnerships and a series of youth-run dialogues. By hosting these mechanisms, issue experts and adolescent voices will jointly inform the global HIV response, fill the research gaps that are not being addressed by existing global initiatives and build adolescent research capacity.


SUPPORT THE ADOPTION OF PATIENT-CENTRED CARE FOR ALL PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV

Develop a set of key tools to be used by implementers that will help reduce the burden on health systems and improve the quality of HIV care. To help resource-limited countries improve care access with greater efficiency in-country, we will focus our efforts on differentiating models of antiretroviral therapy delivery that will have far-reaching benefits across the HIV continuum of care.


DEVELOP A ROAD MAP FOR RESEARCH TOWARDS AN HIV CURE

Under the guidance of a multidisciplinary International Scientific Working Group, the IAS will launch an updated Global Scientific Strategy. The document will provide clarity on a realistic scientific timeline for cure research and contextualize it within the current landscape of options. The strategy will ultimately serve as a tool for researchers, donors and other stakeholders to drive funding and research to accelerate the search for a cure.

These immediate next steps are one part of IAS’ broader effort to strengthen and build its global advocacy platform, ensuring that the organization’s convening power motivates action across the globe and delivers concrete results on the ground.


MEMBERSHIP



The IAS membership is made up of 10,367 individuals from more than 180 countries. IAS Members work on all fronts of the global response to AIDS and include researchers, clinicians, policy and programme planners, and public health and community practitioners. Below is the breakdown of our membership.









#IASONEVOICE

In 2015, the IAS launched a five-year Membership Operational Strategy. As part of the initiative, the IAS launched the #IASONEVOICE grassroots campaign that highlights the stories, opinions, and perspectives of IAS Members. Through this campaign, the IAS has spotlighted the following key issues:

The Syrian refugee crisis and the people working on the frontlines of HIV

The ZIKA outbreak and the connection to HIV

Repressive drug policies and the impact on the HIV epidemic

Youth perspective of growing up HIV positive










Learn more about the campaign here:
www.iasociety.org/Membership/IASONEVOICE



REGIONAL CONSULTATIONS

As a membership-based organization, it is critical that the IAS works with members to strengthen scientific and programmatic knowledge from a global perspective that is relevant at a local level. As part of this commitment, the IAS held two high-level consultations in 2016 focused on region-specific HIV issue areas, convening a multi-sector group:

The Second High Level Consultation Meeting on HIV in Conservative Social Settings
30-31 January 2016, Istanbul, Turkey
Topic: Promoting a more inclusive approach to HIV: Inclusion and support
The Global Institute for Health and Human Rights (GIHHR) and the IAS organized the consultation with support from the OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID) and the Turkish Ministry of Health. Meeting participants were invited to join the IAS as members and to continue using the IAS as a platform to further pursue the consultation purpose.




The Third Regional Consultation on Harm Reduction in Eastern Europe and Central Asia
12-13 May 2016, Odessa, Ukraine
Topic: Can science defeat stigma in the context of the HIV epidemic?
Dr. Sergii Dvoriak, co-founder of the Ukrainian Institute on Public Health Policy (UIPHP), and representative for Eastern Europe on the IAS Governing Council, and Dr. Chris Beyrer, Desmond M. Tutu Professor of Public Health and Human Rights at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and IAS President were the co-chairs of this successful meeting which was carried out in Russian. The meeting report will be published both in Russian and in English.


Photo © Olga Byelyayeva



GOVERNANCE



The Governing Council is the executive body of the IAS. It approves the annual budget and presents financial and other information to the General Members’ Meeting at each International AIDS Conference and each IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention. Furthermore, the Governing Council has all the functions which are not attributed to another organ of the IAS.


President, Chris Beyrer
President-Elect, Linda-Gail Bekker
Treasurer, Anton Pozniak
Immediate Past President, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi
Executive Director, Owen Ryan





REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES ON THE IAS GOVERNING COUNCIL

AFRICA
Alex Muganga Muganzi - Regional Representative
Serge Paul Ehoilé
John Idoko
Faustine Ndugulile
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
Horacio Salomon - Regional Representative
Celia D.C. Christie-Samuels
Mauro Schechter
Luis Soto-Ramirez

ASIA AND THE PACIFIC ISLANDS
Andrew Grulich - Regional Representative
Roy Chan
Adeeba Kamarulzaman
Sai Subhasree Raghavan
UNITED STATES AND CANADA
Kenneth Mayer - Regional Representative
Adaora Adimora
Judith Auerbach
Marina Klein

EUROPE
Jürgen Rockstroh - Regional Representative
Sergii Dvoriak
Jens Lundgren
Stefano Vella
 






PROGRAMMES AND ADVOCACY



 


We utilize our wide network to accelerate collective advocacy action on selected thematic priorities, promote pioneering programme interventions and invest in key research areas that facilitate data for decision-making. Based on the principles of partnerships and collaboration, our strategic initiatives and campaigns aim to address some of the current and future policy and programmatic trends in the HIV response. These include::


TOWARDS AN HIV CURE

Towards an HIV Cure is an initiative to provide leadership in advocating for increased investment in HIV cure research and to facilitate more concerted efforts to accelerate global scientific research.

Towards an HIV Cure 2015 Annual Report: www.iasociety.org/Web/WebContent/File/HIV_Cure_Annual_Report_2015.pdf
Learn more: www.iasociety.org/hivcure



JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL AIDS SOCIETY (JIAS)

The Journal of the International AIDS Society (JIAS) is an open access, indexed and peer-reviewed scientific journal that provides a forum for the dissemination of HIV-related research. Journal articles reflect a broad range of disciplines and efforts are made to publish work originating from countries with high HIV prevalence. In 2016, the JIAS impact factor increased to 6.256 making it sixth out of 83 infectious diseases journals.

Learn more: www.jiasociety.org



THE COLLABORATIVE INITIATIVE FOR PAEDIATRIC HIV EDUCATION AND RESEARCH (CIPHER)

The Collaborative Initiative for Paediatric HIV Education and Research (CIPHER) is a programme aimed at optimizing clinical management and delivery of services to infants, children and adolescents affected by HIV in resource-limited settings through advocacy and research promotion.

CIPHER 2015 Annual Report: www.iasociety.org/Web/WebContent/File/CIPHER_Annual_report_2015.pdf
Learn more: www.iasociety.org/CIPHER



THE INDUSTRY LIASON FORUM (ILF)

The Industry Liaison Forum (ILF), is a mechanism to inform and support collaboration and partnership between diverse stakeholders, including industry and the IAS. It performs this broad task by providing opportunities for industry to understand the IAS’s values, interests and priorities, and vice versa, seeking common ground to enhance the impact of the global response to HIV and related co-morbidities..

ILF Annual Report: www.iasociety.org/Web/WebContent/File/ILF__Annual_Report_2015.pdf
Learn more: www.iasociety.org/ilf



DIFFERENTIATED MODELS OF ART DELIVERY

The Differentiated Models of ART Delivery project is an initiative to support countries in adopting models that optimize the delivery of ART care both for clients and the health system. This project highlights that “it’s time to deliver differently”.

Learn more: www.iasociety.org/Models



NOBODY LEFT BEHIND

The Nobody Left Behind initiative aims to broaden awareness and action to address some of the most pressing issues facing key populations – men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs and transgender people. Addressing stigma and discrimination through the promotion of best practice lies at the heart of this initiative. The ‘Me and my heathcare provider’ campaign provides an opportunity for celebrating frontline workers in the HIV response.

Learn more: www.iasociety.org/KAPs



The IAS EDUCATIONAL FUND

The IAS Educational Fund is a mechanism aimed to provide and invest in educational opportunities that support the frontline HIV workforce. It enabled 130 clinicians and 80 advocates to attend the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) and offers increased virtual access to conference content and a series of symposia hosted in targeted countries to strengthen scientific and programmatic knowledge from a global perspective that is relevant at a local level.

Learn more: www.iasociety.org/educationalfund



ADOLESCENT HIV TREATMENT COALITION

The Adolescent HIV Treatment Coalition (ATC) is a diverse community united in collective advocacy to make quality treatment and care available for all adolescents living with HIV. By providing a platform for a unified voice promoting accountability in the HIV response to the realities of adolescent lives, this broad-based coalition - hosted by the IAS - calls attention to gaps and proposes solutions to adolescent treatment issues.

Learn more: www.iasociety.org/Adolescent-HIV-Treatment-Coalition



YOUTH VOICES

IAS Youth Voices is an advocacy initiative that comprises different activities to enable young people across sub-Saharan Africa to actively shape HIV programmes and investment priorities that respond to their specific needs. By promoting models of youth engagement for those living with and affected by HIV, this initiative firmly believes in the power of young people.

As part of the initiative, the IAS launched the #IASYouthVoices multimedia campaign that highlights the stories and perspectives of youth who are speaking out about their experiences and needs in the HIV response.

Learn more: www.iasociety.org/HIV-programmes/Youth-Voices











 


FINANCIAL REPORTS

SUPPORTERS



THANK YOU TO OUR 2015 - 2016 SUPPORTERS

We would like to thank our extraordinary supporters who helped us realize the impact that has been created in 2015.


ABBOTT MOLECULAR
ABBVIE INC.
ALERE INC.
BD BIOSCIENCES
BILL & MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION
BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB
CANADIAN AIDS RESEARCH NETWORK
CANADIAN INSTITUTES OF HEALTH RESEARCH
(CIHR)
CAPITAL FOR GOOD
CEPHEID INC.
CHEVRON U.S.A. INC.
CIPLA
DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS, TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT, CANADA (DFATD)
DIVISION OF AIDS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (UBC-DAIDS)
EUROPEAN AIDS CLINICAL SOCIETY (EACS)
FEMALE HEALTH COMPANY
FOUNDATION OPEN SOCIETY INSTITUTE (FOSI)
FRENCH NATIONAL AGENCY FOR RESEARCH ON AIDS AND VIRAL HEPATITIS (ANRS)
GILEAD SCIENCES
GLAXOSMITHKLINE
JANSSEN PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.
MAC AIDS FUND
MERCK SHARP & DOHME CORP.
MYLAN LABORATORIES, INC.
OMEGA DIAGNOSTICS
ONTARIO HIV TREATMENT NETWORK
OPEC FUND FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCY OF CANADA
RÉSEAU SIDA ET MALADIES INFECTIEUSES
ROCHE MOLECULAR SYSTEMS
SANOFI AVENTIS
SANOFI PASTEUR
SIDACTION
SYSMEX PARTEC
TD BANK GROUP
TEVA PHARMACEUTICALS
TOURISM VANCOUVER
U.S. NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH – NATIONAL
INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE (NIAID)
U.S. NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH – NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (NICHD)
U.S. NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH – OFFICE OF AIDS RESEARCH (OAR)
UNAIDS, THE JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS
VIIV HEALTHCARE
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)



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