Advocacy–for–Cure Grant Programme

Undeniably progress has been made in supporting the advocacy demands of resource-limited settings in countering the cross-cutting societal issues which arise in locales and their communities affected by HIV. However, a pressing need to foster the advocacy capabilities of local, in-country actors persists.

Acting as a subsidiary of the Advocacy-for-Cure Academies and in continued collaboration with AVAC, the Advocacy-for-Cure Grant Programme seeks to realize these ambitions by providing the necessary means and resources for effective, localized advocacy projects to take place.

Three Advocacy-for-Cure grants are awarded to select advocacy organizations through the academy alumni, who are invited to submit a proposal requesting up to $15,000 to implement a nine-month project. Grants are awarded on the basis that their proposed action implements advocacy strategies to build and/or support HIV cure research in-country; proliferates advocacy networks and translational tools in local contexts; and increases access to HIV cure education and information for clients, advocates and healthcare providers alike.

Outcomes of the selected advocacy projects will be presented and discussed at the 23rd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2020), in San Francisco & Oakland, United States,

Meet the grantees

Philister Adhiambo Madiega

What is your motivation for becoming an HIV cure advocate?

My motivation to advance the course of the HIV cure field is inspired by the promise that a safe and effective HIV cure is our best hope of ending the pandemic forever. I will not let up until that cure is realized or until HIV falls. I would like to make a stride that matters, provide hope to people living with HIV, especially the marginalized and adolescent populations; voice issues on non-disclosure, adherence, stigma, discrimination & criminalizing laws and policies; negotiate for social spaces to discuss challenges & existing barriers; and be an advocate who appreciates that cure may be a combination of approaches to eradicate HIV.

What is the aim of your Project?

TUMAINI (Swahili for “hope”) Kenya intends to increase literacy, uptake and acceptance of HIV cure research among sex workers, healthcare providers, stakeholders and affected communities at large in in Kisumu, Kenya. The project commits to exploring and understanding the perspectives of sex workers and healthcare providers to gain a more holistic comprehension of the current barriers in place to the implementation of cure strategies. Ultimately, the project’s aim is to improve current knowledge, develop community-driven mechanisms to support the HIV cure field, and identify effective tools to advocate for an HIV cure.

Country
Kenya
Organization
Kenya Medical Research Institute – CRS

Owen Mulenga

What is your motivation for becoming an HIV cure advocate?

As an HIV positive person, I always want to be part of the activists who will advocate for the government to increase resources towards research for HIV cure and vaccine. In addition, as a community health advocate and HIV treatment adherence counselor in Kafue, I have failed to answer questions from patients who want to understand how long it will take for an HIV cure to be developed and available. I want to be able to provide my clients, and the broader community, up to date and accurate information on the status of HIV cure research.

What is the aim of your Project?

Stand Up for HIV Cure Research in Zambia aims to create a network of well-informed stakeholders and communities in Zambia, particularly recipients of care, advocates and healthcare providers, who are able to support civic leaders by equipping them with the necessary tools to achieve policy changes related to HIV cure research, and in turn hold them accountable for these changes.

Country
Zambia
Organization
Treatment Advocacy and Literacy Campaign (TALC)

Josephine Nabukenya

What is your motivation for becoming an HIV cure advocate?

Crucial to my role is the need to be well informed on the latest advances in the HIV cure field, hence my motivation is the hope that we instill in all young people up-to-date and accurate information on the current status of HIV cure research and the strategies being pursued. This information is not accessible everywhere, yet there is such thirst for it, especially among young people living with HIV.

What is the aim of your Project?

The Facility to National and National to Facility project (FNNF) seeks to support Cure programmes and provide accurate information about HIV cure strategies through on-site facility sessions and animated short video clips, which will be shared on different social media platforms. The project targets the general population of Uganda, with adolescents and young people being its main focus.

Country
Uganda
Organization
Makerere University – John Hopkins University (MUJHU)
 

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