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IAS 2023

Abstract submission

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Abstract submission is open

Submit an abstract

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Important dates

15 November 2022
Online abstract submission opens.

31 January 2023, (23:59 CET)
Abstract submission closes. Abstracts, as well as amendments to submitted abstracts, will not be accepted after this date (except for late breakers).

20 April 2023
Late-breaker abstract submission opens.

10 May 2023
Late-breaker abstract submission closes.

 

Scientific tracks

IAS 2023, the 12th IAS Conference on HIV Science, welcomes the submission of abstracts for original contributions to the field in the following scientific tracks:

Track A: Basic science

Track A will focus on recent advances made through both basic and translational research to further our understanding of HIV transmission, pathogenesis and persistence. Advances in single-cell, molecular and structural biology methods have led to a greater understanding of mechanisms underlying HIV persistence and the development of anti-HIV immune responses. For example, studies have shown that: intact proviral reservoirs become more clonal over time during suppressive ART; clones of infected cells wax and wane, and antigen stimulation drives clonal expansion; and a subset of HIV-infected cells resists immune-mediated killing, and integration site location may influence persistence. This has led to a greater understanding of specificity and functional features of cellular immune responses that distinguish controllers from non-controllers. In addition, there has been initial proof of concept in humans that bNAb B cell precursors can be targeted and expanded in vivo by rationally designed immunogens. Collectively, these observations highlight some of the challenges ahead and also provide opportunities to develop remission strategies that directly target key drivers of HIV persistence and improve vaccine approaches to generate protective immune responses. Basic science insights and advances highlighted in Track A will be connected to clinical research (Track B) advances where appropriate.

Category

Description

A1

HIV virology

Studies on HIV virology, including viral origins; evolution and diversity; HIV biology; viral fitness; persistence and resistance

A2

HIV pathogenesis

Studies on HIV transmission and dissemination; systemic immune activation and inflammation; CD4+ T cell depletion and reconstitution and immune ageing; microbiomes and microbial translocation and correlates of HIV susceptibility; and progression versus control (biomarkers and genetics)

A3

Host immune responses, vaccines and immunotherapies

Studies on innate immunity; humoral immunity and cellular immunity; advances in vaccine development; T cell vaccines; mucosal immunity; novel vectors; adjuvants and strategies; and immune mechanisms of natural or post-treatment control

A4

Understanding and targeting persistent HIV reservoirs

Studies on HIV reservoirs and latency; host cellular factors and viral mechanisms of HIV/SIV persistence and latency; identification, characterization and quantification of HIV/SIV reservoirs and rebounding virus; strategies to reduce and/or eliminate viral reservoirs; and strategies to control virologic rebound

A5

Novel treatment and prevention strategies

Studies with pre-clinical and clinical results from combination strategies to achieve ARV-free control of HIV-1 viremia; gene therapy; immunotherapy (including broadly neutralizing antibodies) and ARVs; and small molecules and immunomodulating agents – pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics

A6

HIV-associated viruses, co-infections and co-morbidities

Studies with novel insights into the pathophysiology of HIV-1 co-morbidities, in particular in ageing populations; identification of potential therapeutic targets and strategies; and impact of common co-infections (including tuberculosis and viral hepatitis) on HIV persistence and inflammation

A7

SARS-CoV-2 virology, pathogenesis, and host immune responses, vaccines and immunotherapies

Studies related to SARS-Cov2, including immune responses, pathogenesis and vaccines

Track B: Clinical science

The clinical science track will highlight key developments in the management of people with HIV focusing on antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly injectable and longer-acting forms of ART, ART toxicity and the management of HIV co-infections and anal cancer. There are critical knowledge gaps about the efficacy of injectable regimens in harder-to-treat populations, as well as the efficacy and toxicity of the next wave of long-acting treatments. In addition, the issue of ART-associated weight gain will be further explored with a focus on new treatments or ART-switching strategies that could potentially ameliorate this effect. SARS-CoV-2 and monkeypox disproportionately impact people living with HIV globally and require due attention to effective ways of managing these co-infections. In addition, new data on methods to prevent anal cancer in people with HIV and more effective regimens to treat tuberculosis will require reporting on whether these findings can be implemented successfully in affected populations.

Category

Description

B1

Course of HIV disease

Studies including acute and early infection; impact of co-factors on disease progression; and morbidity, mortality and life expectancy in clinical research

B2

Diagnostic and monitoring tools

Studies with novel insights on assays of immune responses and approaches to assess viral load and ARV resistance/tropism; HIV testing (including self-testing, retesting and point-of-care diagnostics); HIV diagnosis in paediatric and adolescent populations; viral load and CD4 monitoring; adherence testing; co-infections and co-morbidities diagnostics; and biomarkers for predicting morbidity and mortality

B3

Co-infections (including opportunistic infections)

Studies on tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, viral hepatitis and STIs, including HPV

B4

Co-morbidities

Studies of all aspects of co-morbidities, including neurologic disorders, mental health, malignancies (AIDS and non-AIDS), cardiovascular disease, bone disease, renal disease, diabetes, hypertension and other non-communicable diseases

B5

Clinical complications of HIV and antiretroviral therapy

Studies on metabolic, lipid and endocrine complications (including lipodystrophy); weight gain; hepatic complications (e.g., NASH); immune reconstitution disorders/immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS); and other ART complications and adverse reactions

B6

HIV and ageing

Studies on clinical issues related to ageing with HIV, including polypharmacy, frailty and drug-drug interaction (DDI)

B7

Antiretroviral therapies and clinical issues in adults

Studies on ART in acute, first- and second-line therapies; ART in highly treatment-experienced persons; regimen simplification and switching; co-formulations of ART and other drugs; pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics/pharmacogenomics and therapeutic drug monitoring; drug interactions; long-acting agents and other drug delivery systems (e.g., injectables, implants, dual therapies, microneedle patches); adherence, sex-specific (including cisgender and trans) issues of ART efficacy; adverse reactions and complications; and pregnancy (clinical management issues and pharmacokinetics) and contraception

B8

Antiretroviral therapies and clinical issues in infants, children and adolescents

Studies on clinical issues for infants, children and adolescents, including pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics/pharmacogenomics and therapeutic drug monitoring; drug formulations; clinical trials; ARV management strategies; cure strategies; adherence; opportunistic infections; TB/HIV co-infection (including treatment and prevention); HIV complications and co-morbidities; HIV-associated co-infections and malignancies in paediatric and adolescent populations; behavioural health outcomes; mental health and neurocognition in paediatric and adolescent populations; HIV-exposed children who did not acquire HIV; and transition of adolescents into adult care

B9

Clinical issues specific to key populations

Studies on clinic issues in gay men and other men who have sex with men, sex workers, trans people, people who use drugs, and prisoners and other incarcerated people

B10

Other strategies and therapies

Studies on cure interventions, complementary and traditional medicines, and nutrition

B11

ART resistance

Studies on all aspects of resistance to ART

B12

SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19 and HIV

Studies including SARS-CoV-2 antiviral therapy in people living with HIV and resistance; impact of COVID-19 on HIV care; and clinical manifestations and features of COVID-19 and HIV co-infection

Track C: Epidemiology and prevention science

We have seen significant advances in the scale up of access to oral PrEP in the past decade. Nevertheless, adherence to daily oral pills remains a challenge for many. The recent approval of long-acting PrEP agents, including the dapivirine vaginal ring and injectable cabotegravir, creates opportunities to expand HIV prevention choices and increase tailoring of HIV prevention programmes to individual needs. We will invite updates on the development of new PrEP agents, review the implications of long-acting PrEP on HIV prevention trial design, and explore efforts to increase inclusion of previously underrepresented populations, such as pregnant and breast-feeding people, adolescents and people who use drugs, in clinical trials. We will encourage submissions that report on progress and lessons from the introduction of approved PrEP agents into a range of settings and populations. We will learn more about innovative approaches to differentiated services that increase choice and access for stigmatized and marginalized populations through demedicalization or integration with contraceptive, STI or gender-affirming hormone therapy services.

The search for an effective HIV vaccine continues. We will learn how COVID-19 has influenced the field of vaccine development, and, together with Track A, this track will review progress in the development of monoclonal antibodies and vaccines for the prevention of HIV, STIs and TB. HIV testing remains an entry point into programmes. We will learn more about advances in diagnostics, including self-testing, as well as the potential uses of recency assays to guide programme implementation and in new HIV prevention trial designs. As progress in HIV treatment and prevention continues, the epidemiology of HIV in many settings is changing. This track will review new insights from molecular epidemiology into this evolution. Mathematical models that quantify the potential impact of an increasing array of effective HIV prevention interventions on the trajectory of the epidemic will also be presented.

Category

Description

C1

Epidemiology of HIV

Studies on the natural history, morbidity patterns and survival of HIV, including all aspects of epidemiology of HIV in specific population groups; factors associated with acquisition, infectivity and transmission of HIV; AIDS events; non-AIDS infections and communicable diseases; non-AIDS non-communicable diseases; and describing HIV transmission through molecular epidemiology

C2

Surveillance: Measuring the HIV epidemic

Studies on the different approaches to surveillance; measuring and monitoring the impact of HIV, including surveillance among key populations; how to measure incidence; how to detect and monitor recent HIV infections; measuring through population-based surveys; measuring the impact of prevention, treatment and/or policy interventions; surveillance of drug resistance; and describing transmission with geographical information systems

C3

Modelling the HIV epidemic

Studies on modelling the HIV epidemic, including the impact of prevention strategies; role of social and sexual networks; syndemics; future healthcare needs; behavioural studies; and the impact of service models

C4

HIV prevention research

Updates on new antiretroviral drugs, long-acting and on-demand formulations and multi-purpose products. Studies on HIV prevention, including PrEP, such as PrEP use and scale up; PEP; voluntary medical male circumcision; integrating STI, sexual and reproductive health and hepatitis B and C services in HIV prevention programmes; sexuality; gender and prevention technologies; combination prevention strategies; innovative behavioural interventions; structural HIV prevention interventions; and measuring and enhancing retention and adherence in HIV prevention programmes

C5

Sexual and reproductive health and HIV prevention

Studies on HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health, including integration of services, co-formulation of HIV prevention and contraceptive care products

C6

Population-specific interventions for HIV prevention

Studies on HIV prevention interventions for specific populations, including studies on HIV prevention interventions for specific populations, including for key population and reaching key populations; key population-led prevention programmes; access to harm reduction interventions; optimizing vertical transmission prevention programmes; studies on PrEP for specific populations including data on the use of these agents in pregnant and lactating populations as well as those using hormone therapy; studies that seek inclusion of previously excluded populations in programmes and trials; and efforts to accelerate access to HIV prevention for pregnant and breastfeeding people, adolescents, people who use drugs, as well as populations excluded from programmes because of stigma

C7

HIV testing

Studies on HIV testing, including demand creation; facility-based, community-based, peer-led testing strategies; testing to support prevention; re-engagement and integration with other services; testing with virtual and/or digital support; HIV self-testing; and HIV testing algorithms

C8

Cascades of HIV care and treatment

Studies on strategies to improve HIV linkage to both prevention and treatment, ART initiation, retention in care (first year on ART and beyond), and re-engagement

C9

Epidemiology of COVID-19

Studies on all aspects of the epidemiology of COVID-19, including among people living with HIV and/or tuberculosis, effects on HIV epidemiology and prevention, COVID-19 testing and prevention

Track D: Social and behavioural sciences

Track D will stimulate a critical discussion on the status of the field of HIV at the beginning of the fifth decade. This is at a time when HIV has become a manageable chronic disease in many parts of the world and the prevention landscape seems completely different from what it was three decades ago – and yet there is still considerable delay in the rollout of new biomedical tools that provide that new outlook. Hence, the track will assess the role of social and behavioural science not only in contextualizing prevention and care research and practice, but also in assessing trends in social and behavioural research on HIV. It will also assess the impact of such research on ongoing debates and emerging thinking about the evolution of prevention and care vis-à-vis ongoing changes in sexual behaviour, sexual cultures, technology and society in general.

Category

Description

D1

Social science theories, concepts and methods

Studies that showcase work focused on advancing and reflecting upon social science theories, methods and the social production of knowledge in the HIV field

D2

Social and behavioural aspects and approaches to HIV

Including studies that address the present experience of people living with HIV on populations vulnerable in specific contexts; community mobilization and demand creation; harm reduction; intersectional identities; interventions to reduce stigma and discrimination; and the U=U paradigm

D3

Social, political, legal and behavioural determinants of health in different contexts

Studies that highlight new perspectives on social/structural drivers and contexts of both external and endogenous/internal to affected communities, including policies and laws

D4

Key populations and other vulnerable populations: Behavioural, social and cultural issues and contexts

Studies that focus on key populations and other vulnerable populations in specific geographic and cultural contexts, including the way in which prevention technologies become owned by users through transformation of prescribed practices, legal and political barriers to care; and the role of criminalization

D5

Sexuality, gender, relationships and sexual cultures

Studies that address adolescents, sexuality and relationships; gender issues and gendered relationships; gender-transformative approaches; and sexual concurrency and sexual networks

D6

Sexualities and sexual cultures: Meanings, identities, norms and communities

Studies that identify new social/structural interventions that are needed in response to the emerging social contexts and sexual cultures (e.g., increasing migration, the economic crisis and increasing poverty)

D7

Social and behavioural aspects and approaches to COVID-19

Studies that address implications for access to HIV care due to COVID-19; social and behavioural aspects and approaches to COVID-19; mental health challenges for people living with HIV; and effects on key populations

Track E: Implementation science, economics, systems and synergies

While prevention and treatment options have improved and expanded dramatically over the past few years, there remains a gap between Phase 3 trials of new agents in well-resourced clinical research sites and scale up in real-world settings to ensure that these highly efficacious tools are delivered to the populations that have the greatest need and are likely to experience the most benefit. Concurrently, people living with HIV continue to age with non-communicable diseases, accounting for an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality in these populations globally. It is thus critical for programmes to pivot from a disease-centric to a person-centric approach to ensure that interventions address the needs of individuals. For key populations, such as trans people, men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs, strategies for horizontal integration across health systems will be equally critical for optimizing outcomes. These strategies include integrating hormone replacement therapy, harm reduction services and mental health services, along with HIV testing and ART. Until recently, delivery of comprehensive prevention and treatment services from physical venues was the norm. However, one of the collaterals of COVID-19-associated restrictions was the development of novel treatment and prevention models that utilized either technology or peer and/or outreach workers to decentralize service delivery, with models such as field- or home-based ART delivery being more prevalent.

Category

Description

E1

Implementation science and scale up of HIV testing

Studies including implementation science of HIV testing; HIV status-neutral approaches, differentiated HIV testing services; innovations in e-health; and telehealth and other digital innovations to support HIV testing

E2

Implementation science and scale up of prevention

Studies on the who, what, when, where and why of the prevention toolbox that seek to identify the critical success factors for programme implementation, including acceptability, ease of delivery, cost, population at risk and background incidence; supporting HIV prevention effective use and adherence; innovations in e-health; and telehealth and other digital innovations to support HIV prevention services

E3

Implementation science and scale up of treatment

Studies on the implementation and scale up of HIV treatment, including optimal strategies for delivery of long-acting ART technologies; care of older people living with HIV; differentiated service delivery across the cascade; strategies to increase retention and re-engagement in HIV services; innovations in e-health; telehealth and other digital innovations to support HIV treatment; access to models of integrated services; enhancing U=U communication; and implementation of viral load monitoring

E4

Global and national financing, economic evaluation and sustainability

Studies including national analyses and international assistance; analyses, frameworks and mechanisms for HIV, hepatitis and STI programmes and services and transitional financing; financing HIV within UHC frameworks; payment by results and other performance-based mechanisms; approaches to achieving sustainability, including sustainable financing for civil society; HIV, hepatitis and STI testing and drug access; and approaches and evidence from cross-sectoral programming and financing

E5

Costing, cost effectiveness and affordability

Studies on costing of HIV, hepatitis and STI services; assessments of cost effectiveness (provider and community perspectives); economic evaluation and affordability assessments; and incentives

E6

Health systems, health systems strengthening and partnerships

Studies including approaches to supporting resilient health systems, community participation in systems for health, and getting policies into practice; task sharing; public-private partnerships; supporting effective linkages between maternal child health and HIV services; making health systems work for adolescents; services for underserved populations; and effective delivery of long-term chronic care

E7

HIV and development synergies

Studies that focus on combination programming on social drivers of HIV and delivering gender-transformative programmes and tackling sexual and gender-based violence; and studies that showcase new evidence and programmatic lessons on social protection

E8

Integration of HIV services with other health and support services

Studies that move from disease-centric to person-centric and share good practice models of horizontal integration of communicable, non-communicable, mental health and social support services

E9

Innovations in data collection, monitoring and evaluation

Studies including innovations in behavioural data collection and use; innovative approaches to track individuals; and innovative uses of data to strengthen systems and programmes; approaches to evaluation of large-scale programmes; approaches to evaluating combination prevention programmes for monitoring and reporting in the SDG agenda; and using big data in the HIV response and approaches to using data to improve programming

E10

Impact of COVID-19 on HIV prevention, testing and treatment (including financing)

Studies on the impact of COVID-19 on HIV prevention, testing, and treatment services; financing the HIV response; and optimizing HIV services in the COVID-19 era

Each scientific track is divided into track categories. All abstract authors are asked to choose one scientific track and one track category during the submission process.

By submitting an abstract to the conference, you agree to adhere to the conference embargo policy. The policy specifies that while authors may publish the fact that their abstract has been selected for inclusion in the conference programme, they may NOT share data from the abstract in any form (print, broadcast or online publication, media release or conference presentation) before its official presentation at IAS 2023.

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Call for abstracts

We encourage work that introduces new ideas, concepts and research and deepens understanding in the field, as well as analyses of both successes and failures. Please read the following guidelines carefully before submitting your abstract:

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  • Abstracts can be submitted only online via the conference account. Submissions by fax, post or email will not be considered.

  • All abstracts must be written in English.

  • It is the author’s responsibility to submit an abstract with the correct wording. Any errors in spelling, grammar or scientific fact in the abstract text will be reproduced exactly as typed by the author. Abstract titles will be subject to a spellcheck if the abstract is selected for presentation.

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Late-breaker abstracts

A small number of late-breaker abstracts will be accepted for oral or poster presentation at the conference.

The late-breaker abstract submission will be open from 20 April to 10 May 2023. Late-breaker submissions must introduce data of unquestioned significance that meet a high threshold of scientific merit.

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During abstract submission, authors will have to justify why their abstract should be considered as a late breaker. The same submission rules apply for late-breaker abstracts as for regular abstracts, but each presenting author may present only one late-breaker abstract at the conference.

The percentage of abstracts selected as late breakers will depend on the number of submissions, but selection will be far more rigorous than for regular abstracts.

Questions

  • For technical questions regarding the abstract submission system, please contact the Abstracts team at [email protected].

  • For general questions regarding abstracts, please see the FAQ.

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Policies for abstract submission

Copyright policy

Abstracts must not include libellous or defamatory content. Material presented in abstracts must not violate any copyright laws. If figures, graphics and/or images have been taken from sources not copyrighted by the author, it is the author’s sole responsibility to secure the rights from the copyright holder in writing to reproduce those figures, graphics and/or images for both worldwide print and web publication. The author must bear all reproduction costs charged by the copyright holder.

Language

As the official IAS 2023 language is English, all abstracts must be in English. If English is not your native language, please arrange for a native English speaker to review your abstract before submission. Please use the UNAIDS terminology guidelines and People First terminology when drafting and submitting your abstract. Please ensure that you DO NOT use stigmatizing language. DO use: people or person living with HIV; person or people with COVID-19; person or people with TB; healthcare seekers or clients. DO NOT label people as: HIV-infected; infected; cases; carriers; victims; patients.

Resubmission policy

An abstract that has been previously published or presented at a national, regional or international meeting can be submitted to IAS 2023 only if there are new methods, findings, updated information or other valid reasons for resubmitting.

If preliminary or partial data have been published or presented previously, the submitting author will be required to provide details of the publication or presentation, along with a justification of why the abstract merits being considered for IAS 2023. The IAS 2023 Organizing Committee will consider this information when making final decisions.

If the author neglects to provide these required details and justification or if evidence of previous publication or presentation is found, the abstract will be rejected.

Plagiarism

The conference organizers regard plagiarism as serious professional misconduct. All abstracts are screened for plagiarism and, when identified, the abstract and any other abstracts submitted by the same author are rejected. In addition, the submitting author’s account and scholarship application (if one has been submitted) will be cancelled.

Co-submission

IAS 2023 may negotiate co-submission of abstracts with affiliated events, pre-events and/or external events. Visit the Co-submission section further down on this page for updated information.

Ethical research declaration

The conference supports only research that has been conducted according to the protocol approved by the institutional or local committee on ethics in human investigation. Where no such committee exists, the research should have been conducted in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki of the World Medical Association. If you answer “no” or “not applicable”, you will be required to provide a written explanation for your answer. The IAS 2023 Organizing Committee may enquire further into ethical aspects when evaluating abstracts.

Conference embargo policy

As is the case with most scientific and medical conferences, abstracts from IAS 2023 are released to delegates and media under a strict embargo policy. The conference embargo policy can be found here. All conference delegates, presenters and media agree to respect this policy.

Abstract submission process

Conference account

Authors must create a conference account to submit an abstract. More than one abstract can be submitted through a conference account. After an abstract has been created, modifications can be made until 31 January 2023, 23:59 Central European Time.

Choosing a track category

The track category is the general heading under which the abstract will be reviewed and later published in the conference materials if accepted. During the submission process, you will be asked to select one track category for your abstract. Choose the track category that best describes the subject of the abstract.

Abstract structure

The conference offers two options for abstract submission:

Option 1

This is suitable for research conducted in all disciplines. Abstracts submitted under Option 1 should contain concise statements of:

  • Background: Indicate the purpose and objective of the research, the hypothesis that was tested, or a description of the problem being analysed or evaluated.

  • Methods: Describe the study period, setting and location, study design, study population, data collection and methods of analysis used.

  • Results: Present as clearly and in as much detail as possible the findings and/or outcomes of the study. Please disaggregate data by age and gender where possible and summarize any specific results.

  • Conclusions: Explain the significance of your study’s findings and/or outcomes for HIV prevention, treatment, care and/or support and future implications of the results.

The following review criteria will be used in scoring abstracts submitted under Option 1:

  1. Is there a clear background and justified objective?

  2. Is the methodology and/or study design appropriate for the objectives?

  3. Are the results important and clearly presented?

  4. Are the conclusions supported by the results?

  5. Is the study original and does it contribute to the field?

Option 2

This is suitable for lessons learnt through programme, project or policy implementation or management. Abstracts submitted under Option 2 should contain concise statements of:

  • Background: Summarize the purpose, scope and objectives of the programme, project or policy.

  • Description: Describe the programme, project or policy period, setting and location, the structure, key population (if applicable) and activities and interventions undertaken in support of the programme, project or policy.

  • Lessons learnt: Present as clearly and in as much detail as possible the findings and/or outcomes of the programme, project or policy. Include an analysis or evaluation of lessons learnt and best practices. Please summarize any specific results that support your lessons learnt and best practices.

  • Conclusions/next steps: Explain the significance of the findings and/or outcomes of the programme, project or policy for HIV prevention, treatment, care and/or support and future implications of the results.

The following review criteria will apply to abstracts submitted under Option 2:

  1. Is there a clear background and justified objective?

  2. Are the programme, project or policy design and implementation appropriate for the objectives?

  3. Are the lessons learnt or best practices important, supported by the findings and clearly presented?

  4. Are the conclusions/next steps supported by the results and are they feasible?

  5. Is the work reported original and does it contribute to the field? 

Disaggregation by sex and other demographic data in abstracts 

Authors are encouraged to provide a breakdown of data by gender identity and/or assigned sex at birth and other demographics, such as age, geographic region, racial/ethnic identity and/or other relevant demographic characteristics in submitted abstracts, when appropriate. Your abstract should include the number and percentage of men and women who participated in your research or project (and additional breakdown by gender, age and/or ethnicity if appropriate). Results should be disaggregated by sex/gender and other relevant demographics. Analyses of any gender-based differences or any other differences between sub-populations should be provided in the Results or Lessons learnt sections, if relevant.

Font

Use a standard font, such as Arial, when formatting the text. This helps prevent special characters from getting lost when copying the text to the online abstract submission form. Ensure that you check the final abstract with the system’s preview function before submission, and edit or replace if necessary.

Word limits

The abstract is limited to 350 words. Titles are limited to 30 words.

A maximum of two tables and/or graphs or images can be included. A graph or image (in JPG, GIF or PNG, ideally 600dpi) counts as 50 words and a table counts as five words per row (50 words maximum).

Common reasons for abstract rejection:

  • Abstract poorly written

  • Not enough new information

  • Clear objective and/or hypothesis missing

  • Methods (either quantitative or qualitative) inadequate and/or insufficient to support conclusions

  • Summary of essential results inadequate and/or missing

  • Study conclusions not supported by the data

  • Linkage between different parts of the abstract not comprehensible

  • Duplicate or overlap with another abstract

  • Study too preliminary or insufficient to draw conclusions

  • Study originality lacking

Recommendations:

  • Abstracts should disclose primary findings and avoid, whenever possible, promissory statements, such as “experiments are in progress” or “results/lessons learnt will be discussed”.

  • If English is not your native language, arrange for a native English speaker to review your abstract before submission.

  • IAS – the International AIDS Society – offers an Abstract Mentor Programme for less experienced submitters. Please see further information below.

Submission confirmation

After submission of the abstract, a confirmation email will be sent to the abstract submitter. To receive confirmation, please ensure that your email provider does not mark emails from [email protected] as spam. 

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Abstract review and selection process

Abstract review

All submitted abstracts will go through a blind peer-review process carried out by international reviewers. At least three reviewers will review each abstract.

Abstract selection

A small number of abstracts will be selected for oral presentation in a session or as a paper poster to be displayed on site. The majority of abstracts selected for the conference will be displayed as on-demand e-posters virtually on the conference platform.

Notification of acceptance or rejection to the corresponding author

Notification of acceptance or rejection will be sent to the submitting (corresponding) author by mid-April. Please note that only the corresponding author will receive an email concerning the abstract; this author is responsible for informing all co-authors of the status of the abstract. The presenting author, whose abstract has been accepted, will receive instructions for the presentation of their abstract.

Rule of two

Each presenting author may present a maximum of two abstracts at the conference. The number of submissions is, however, not limited. If an author has more than two abstracts accepted for presentation, a co-author must be named as the presenting author for one or more abstracts.

Each presenting author may also present one late-breaker abstract at the conference.

Publication of accepted abstracts

The submission of an abstract constitutes the author(s)’ consent for publication. If the abstract is accepted, the author(s) agree that the abstract is published under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) licence. The licence allows third parties to share the published work (copy, distribute, transmit) and to adapt it for any purposes, under the condition that IAS 2023 and authors are given credit and that in the event of reuse or distribution, the terms of this licence are made clear. Authors retain the copyright of their abstract, with first publication rights granted to the IAS.

Accepted abstracts may, therefore, be published on IAS websites and in such publications as the IAS 2023 online conference programme and other conference materials, the IAS abstract archive and the Journal of the International AIDS Society (JIAS).

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Co-submission

If you are inviting authors to present abstracts at your conference or workshop in the run up to IAS 2023, you may wish to consider applying for abstract co-submission with IAS 2023. Co-submission means that selected abstracts may be presented at your event and at IAS 2023 without breaking the embargo policy even though your event will take place before the conference.

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To apply for co-submission of abstracts with IAS 2023, your event should meet the following conditions:

  • The event must be closed.

    • Delegates will attend the event on an invite-only or paid-registration basis (that is, sessions are not open to the general public).

    • Media representatives are not invited or they must agree to comply with the IAS 2023 embargo policy.

    • Any sessions involving co-submitted abstracts that will be recorded must comply with the IAS 2023 embargo policy.

  •  A final list of abstracts presented at the event must be shared with the organizers of IAS 2023 before the event.

  •  Authors must submit their abstract using the IAS 2023 submission system if they wish to be considered for inclusion in IAS 2023.

In addition, although not mandatory, for events that meet the conditions, it is highly recommended that organizers apply for IAS 2023 Affiliated Independent Event status.

If you wish to apply for co-submission, please contact us at [email protected]. The deadline to apply for co-submission is 31 March 2023.

FAQs

What is an abstract?

For IAS 2023, the 12th IAS Conference on HIV Science, an abstract is a standalone statement that briefly explains the essential information of a study, research project, policy or programme.

Where can I read more about the scientific tracks?

Detailed descriptions of the scope and objectives of each scientific track, as defined by the IAS 2023 Organizing Committee, can be found on the abstract submission page.

When is the submission deadline for abstracts?

The deadline for submission of abstracts is 31 January 2023, 23:59 CET.

My project is ongoing and there are no results yet. Should I submit an abstract?

Abstracts are intended to present scientific studies, research, programmes and policies, highlighting the methods and/or description and results and/or recommendations. If you are describing a study that is still in the planning stage, it would not be suitable for submission unless the methods that you use is, for example, of particular scientific interest. However, if your study is ongoing and you have preliminary data that seems relevant or significant, please submit an abstract.

What is a late-breaker abstract?

Late-breaker submissions must introduce data of unquestioned significance. Data analysed after the regular submission deadline (31 January 2023) should not be sent in for late breakers if the data do not meet an extremely high standard of scientific merit. The percentage of abstracts selected as late breakers will depend on the number of submissions made, but selection will certainly be more rigorous than for regular abstracts. A small number of late-breaker abstracts will be accepted for presentation orally or as posters at the conference.

During their abstract submission, authors will have to declare the reason why their abstract is a late breaker. The same submission rules apply for late-breaker abstracts as for regular abstracts, but each presenting author may present only one late-breaker abstract at the conference. Late-breaker abstract submission will be open from 20 April to 10 May 2023.

What is the required structure for an abstract?

An abstract consists of a title, author list and abstract text no longer than 350 words. It can also include tables or graphs and/or images. Literature references should not be included.

IAS 2023 offers two options for abstract submission:

Option 1

This is suitable for research conducted in all disciplines. Abstracts submitted under Option 1 should contain concise statements of:

  • Background: Indicate the purpose and objective of the research, the hypothesis that was tested or a description of the problem being analysed or evaluated.

  • Methods: Describe the study period, setting and location, study design, study population, data collection and methods of analysis used.

  • Results: Present as clearly and in as much detail as possible the findings and/or outcomes of the study. Please disaggregate data by age and gender where possible and summarize any specific results.

  • Conclusions: Explain the significance of the findings and/or outcomes of your study for HIV prevention, treatment, care and/or support and future implications of the results.

Option 2

This is suitable for lessons learnt through programme, project or policy implementation or management. Abstracts submitted under Option 2 should contain concise statements of:

  • Background: Summarize the purpose, scope and objectives of the programme, project or policy.

  • Description: Describe the programme, project or policy period, setting and location, structure, key population (if applicable) and activities and interventions undertaken in support of the programme, project or policy.

  • Lessons learnt: Present as clearly and in as much detail as possible the findings and/or outcomes of the programme, project or policy. Include an analysis or evaluation of lessons learnt and best practices. Please summarize any specific results that support your lessons learnt and best practices.

  • Conclusions/next steps: Explain the significance of the findings and/or outcomes of the programme, project or policy for HIV prevention, treatment, care and/or support and future implications of the results.

How do I submit an abstract?

Before submitting an abstract, you will be asked to create a conference account. One or several abstracts can be submitted through this account.

To submit abstracts, please log in to your conference account and click on the “Abstract submission” box on the conference account overview page. Then click on the red button, “Submit an abstract”. In the abstract submission system:

  1. Select the track, category and country of research. Enter your abstract title and text.

  2. Enter the presenting author and co-authors (individually).

  3. Preview your abstract and check format and correctness.

  4. Submit your abstract.

After an abstract has been created, modifications can be made at any time until the submission deadline. After submission, the abstract submitter will receive a confirmation email with an abstract reference number. Please refer to this reference number in all conference correspondence.

Once submitted, can I still modify my abstract?

After an abstract has been submitted via the conference account, modifications can be made until the submission deadline, 31 January 2023. After making your modifications, you need to resubmit your abstract. No modifications will be accepted after 31 January 2023.

How should I write the title of my abstract?

A good abstract title is short, specific, representative and informative. It helps the reviewers categorize your abstract and, if accepted, it may help conference delegates find your presentation. The title should summarize your abstract without going into excessive details. Describe the topic clearly, including, for example, the population, country and issue of the research. Titles are limited to 30 words.

Can I include a table, graph or image in my abstract?

It is permitted but not mandatory to include tables, graphs and/or images in the abstract. A maximum of two tables, graphs or images in total can be included. A graph or image (in JPG, GIF or PNG, ideally 600dpi) counts as 50 words, and a table counts as five words per row (50 words maximum). As a reminder, the abstract text body is limited to 350 words.

Please create your table or upload your graph or image following the instructions in the abstract submission system. Place the table, graph or image into your abstract text and save the changes. Review the abstract preview page to ensure that your table, graph and/or image displays properly.

How many co-authors can I include?

There is no limit to the number of co-authors per abstract, although we strongly recommend the use of a study group name for abstracts with a high number of co-authors. A person can be listed as a co-author if they meet ALL the following criteria:

  1. They made substantial contributions to concept and design, acquisition of data or analysis and interpretation of data.

  2. They drafted the abstract or revised it for intellectual content.

  3. They approved the final version to be submitted.

Do I need to disclose information about any conflict of interest in my abstract?

If the abstract is accepted, the presenting authors are asked to disclose all financial and personal relationships between themselves and others that might be perceived as biasing their work. The conference organizer asks that all presenting authors disclose any conflict of interest at the time of presentation for the benefit of conference delegates. The purpose of this is to guarantee that all potential conflicts of interest are recognized and that mechanisms to resolve them before the conference are implemented.

Material presented in abstracts should not violate any copyright laws. If figures, graphics and/or images have been taken from sources not copyrighted by the author, it is the author’s sole responsibility to secure the rights from the copyright holder in writing to reproduce those figures, graphics and/or images for both worldwide print and web publication. The author must bear all reproduction costs charged by the copyright holder.

Who selects the abstracts and decides how they will be presented?

All submitted abstracts will go through a blind peer-review process by international reviewers. At least three reviewers will review each abstract. The IAS 2023 Organizing Committee makes the final selection of abstracts to be included in the conference programme.

The highest-scoring abstracts will be selected for presentation in an oral abstract session. All e-posters will be displayed on site in the exhibition hall and virtually on the conference platform. In addition, a small number of high-scoring posters will be selected for oral presentation in e-poster sessions on site.

How can I increase the chances of my abstract being accepted?

The methodology or study design presented in your abstract should be appropriate to address the purpose and objectives. Results or lessons learnt should be clearly presented and support the conclusions. In addition, the findings should contribute to the advancement of knowledge and development in the field.

If English is not your native language, we strongly recommend that you arrange for a native English speaker working in your field to review your abstract before submission.

Please use the UNAIDS terminology guidelines and People First terminology when drafting and submitting your abstract. Please ensure that you DO NOT use stigmatizing language. DO use: people or person living with HIV; person or people with COVID-19; person or people with TB; healthcare seekers or clients. DO NOT label people as: HIV-infected; infected; cases; carriers; victims; patients.

You may check the common reasons for abstract rejection in the abstract submission guidelines found further up on this page.

You may also review examples of abstracts from previous conferences.

When will I be notified if my abstract submission has been successful?

Notification of acceptance or rejection will be sent to the submitting (corresponding) author by mid-April.

I need a certificate that shows that my abstract was accepted for the conference. Who do I contact?

To obtain a certificate for abstracts accepted, please contact [email protected].

Who has the copyright for my abstract after submission?

The submission of the abstract constitutes the authors’ consent to publish. If the abstract is accepted, the authors agree that their abstract can be published under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) licence. The licence allows third parties to share the published work (copy, distribute, transmit) and adapt it for any purposes, under the condition that IAS 2023 and the authors are given credit, and that in the event of reuse or distribution, the terms of this licence are made clear. Authors retain the copyright of their abstracts, with first publication rights granted to IAS – the International AIDS Society.

Will there be an abstract book for IAS 2023?

An electronic abstract book will be available free of charge on the conference website.

Where will my abstract be published?

Accepted abstracts will be published on IAS websites and in such publications as the IAS 2023 online programme and other conference materials, the IAS abstract archive and the Journal of the International AIDS Society (JIAS).